Save Passamaquoddy Bay

Save Passamaquoddy Bay
3-Nation Alliance

Alliance to Protect the Quoddy Region
from LNG Development

US Flag
US
Canadian Flag
Canada
Passamaquoddy Flag
Passamaquoddy
Scale Baskets for sale
Loading
Facebook button

"For much of the state of Maine, the environment is the economy"
                                           — US Senator Susan Collins, 2012 Jun 21



 

Latest News


2015 March 24

Passamaquoddy Bay

Downeast LNG, Inc.; Application for long-term authorization to export liquefied natural gas produced from domestic natural gas resources to Non-Free Trade Agreement countries for a 20-year period (Mar 16) — Department of Energy, Federal Register

FE Docket No. 14–173–LNG
Notice of Application

SUMMARY: …DELNG seeks authorization to export the natural gas as liquefied natural gas (LNG) by vessel from its proposed LNG terminal to be located in Robbinston, Maine, referred to as the Downeast LNG Import-Export Project.

DELNG requests authorization to export LNG to any country with which the United States does not have a free trade agreement (FTA) requiring national treatment for trade in natural gas and with which trade is not prohibited by U.S. law or policy (non- FTA countries). DELNG requests this non-FTA export authorization for a 20- year term to commence on the earlier of the date of first export or eight years from the date the authorization is granted. DELNG requests this authorization both on its own behalf and as agent for other entities who hold title to the LNG at the time of export. The Application was filed under section 3 of the Natural Gas Act (NGA). Additional details can be found in DELNG’s Application, posted on the DOE/FE Web site at:
http://energy.gov/ sites/prod/files/2014/10/f18/ 14_173_lng_nfta_talbert.pdf
. [PDF file; 201.35 KB]
Protests, motions to intervene, notices of intervention, and written comments are invited.

DATES: Protests, motions to intervene or notices of intervention, as applicable, requests for additional procedures, and written comments are to be filed using procedures detailed in the Public Comment Procedures section no later than 4:30 p.m., Eastern time, May 15, 2015.

ADDRESSES:
Electronic Filing by email
fergas@hq.doe.gov
Regular Mail
U.S. Department of Energy (FE–34),
Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply,
Office of Fossil Energy,
P.O. Box 44375,
Washington, DC 20026–4375. [Colored & bold emphasis added.]

Webmaster's comment: This is not the FERC permit; this is a separate Department of Energy (DOE) requirement for exporting natural gas to nations that are not parties to the Free Trade Agreement. Downeast LNG has already received DOE authorization to export LNG to nations that are parties to the Free Trade Agreement.

Turkey says no to LNG tankers in the Bosporus Strait, cuts off Black Sea shipping — Oil & Gas 360

[This article also appears under the Turkey heading, below.]

Turkey’s decision could cut off Black Sea countries like Ukraine from LNG tankers

Turkey announced that it will not allow the passage of tankers with liquefied natural gas (LNG) across the Bosporus Strait for fuel supplies to Ukraine, Turkish Ambassador to Kiev Yonet Can Tezel said in an interview Friday. The Bosporus Strait is the only waterway connecting the Black Sea to the Sea of Marmara and on to the Mediterranean, meaning no LNG tankers will be able to enter or leave the Black Sea.

The Ambassador said Turkey’s position was based exclusively on the aspect of maritime shipment safety as the passage of tankers with hazardous cargoes posed a threat to residents of Istanbul, which is divided by the Bosporus Strait, reports Russian news agency TASS. [Colored & bold emphasis added.]

Webmaster's comment: Get it, Downeast LNG? The strait's coastal nation (Turkey) prohibits LNG ship transits through the strait for safety reasons — just as Canada prohibits LNG transits through Head Harbour Passage to and from Downeast LNG's proposed terminal.

Nova Scotia

Bear Head LNG receives permit to construct (Mar 13) — Cape Breton Post, Cape Breton, NS

HALIFAX – The Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board today issued Bear Head Liquefied Natural Gas Corp. an updated and amended permit to construct, making the project the first in Eastern Canada to be granted such authorization.

Bear Head LNG has obtained nine of the 10 initial Canadian federal, provincial, and local regulatory approvals needed to construct a liquefied natural gas export facility on the Strait of Canso.

The Bear Head LNG site is located in Point Tupper, Richmond County, half the shipping distance to major European markets, compared to U.S. Gulf Coast ports.

Webmaster's comment: Of curious note is that Bear Head LNG has not received authority from the US to re-export US-source natural gas as LNG to third party nations, although it has applied for that authorization. Where does Bear Head LNG intend to obtain the natural gas it requires to export if denied by the US?

Maine

Drilling group unlikely to tap Gulf of Maine for oil and gas (Mar 3) — Portland Press Herald, Portland, ME [Paid subscription]

Some worried that it might try after Gov. LePage joined the coalition, but an assessment finds the geology of the gulf limits its energy-supply potential.

The assessment by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, updated last year, trimmed the already modest estimates in the North Atlantic to levels that virtually eliminate the possibility of oil and gas drilling off New England.

“In plain English, the geology doesn’t support commercial viability,” John Filostrat, a spokesman for the bureau, told the Portland Press Herald. “Based on the assessment of the data we have, there’s no resource potential in the Gulf of Maine.” [Colored & bold emphasis added.]

New England

The final word on Winter in New England’s energy markets, part I: The difference a year makes — Conservation Law Foundation

Despite dire predictions and some of the worst winter weather on record, there wasn’t a crisis. Modest market shifts made a huge difference, driving down prices, assuring the lights stayed on, and calling into question the wisdom of the region making big new bets on gas pipelines and transmission infrastructure.

Natural gas and wholesale power prices were down compared to last year’s prices—way down. Gas from better-utilized pipelines and shipments of liquefied natural gas were amply supplying power plants, even on cold days. Despite higher electric bills, lower oil and gasoline prices were helping many consumers pay less overall for their energy needs than last winter.

Overall, from December 1 to March 20, prices were down 45%. That’s despite the fact that this winter was colder overall than last year, with a temperature in the Boston area about 4°F below historical averages and 1.5°F colder than last year. [Colored & bold emphasis added.]

As New England freezes, natural gas stays cheap (Mar 2) — Rigzone

Twelve months ago, tumultuous weather in the U.S. Northeast caused record natural gas price spikes and forced some power plants to shut for lack of fuel as power producers scrambled to outbid each other for scarce supplies.

This February, the region has shivered through the coldest weather in 81 years, yet gas prices are a fifth lower than a year ago after power generators, learning lessons from last winter, stocked up on extra oil and gas from domestic and overseas sources before the weather turned cold. [Colored & bold emphasis added.]

Pipeline opponents say LNG is underutilized (Mar 23) — The Boston Globe, Boston, MA

Opponents of proposed natural gas pipelines that would crisscross Massachusetts may have a new ally: a multinational importer of liquefied natural gas.

As Governor Charlie Baker tries to organize a summit of New England governors to address regional energy needs — including the hotly contested issue of building natural gas pipelines — Distrigas of Massachusetts LLC says its LNG facility in Everett is more than capable of meeting the rising demand for natural gas. Officials at Distrigas, owned by France’s GDF Suez, question the need for two multibillion-dollar pipeline projects proposed by other energy suppliers and vehemently opposed by neighbors and environmental groups.

Distrigas’s Everett terminal, company officials said, is running at about 50 percent capacity, despite a 60 percent increase in LNG shipments this year.

Some energy suppliers … note security risks associated with LNG shipments into Boston Harbor, where a team of heavily armed security personnel are deployed in boats and along shorelines every time an LNG tanker steams into the harbor. In the past, law enforcement officials have been concerned about potential terrorist attacks.

But Distrigas’s credibility as an additional source of energy grew this winter when increased LNG imports were credited with helping avert natural gas shortages during this winter’s extreme cold and record-breaking snow.

Heading into this winter, generators jacked up electricity prices by as much as 40 percent in anticipation of natural gas shortages, which were passed on to consumers by utilities. But those natural gas shortages and electricity price spikes did not happen this winter, partly due to increased LNG shipments.

Spectra Energy Corp. … has teamed with local utilities Eversource Energy (formerly Nstar and Northeast Utilities) and National Grid to expand the existing Algonquin gas pipeline system in the region. Known as Access Northeast, that project also includes expanding the capacity of the Maritimes & Northeast line, which carries liquefied natural gas from ships anchored off Eastern Canada. The project could cost up to $3 billion. (Customers would pay the costs of pipeline projects through higher rates.) [Colored & bold emphasis added.]

Webmaster's comment: There also are two (~5 years old) underused new offshore LNG import terminals in Massachusetts Bay (Neptune LNG and Northeast Gateway), and an existing shoreside LNG import terminal at Saint John, New Brunswick (Canaport LNG). Neptune LNG service has been suspended for lack of use — no imports in 5 years. Those existing terminals are more than sufficient to meet regional peak natural gas demands.

Old system, new solution?: Liquefied natural gas could be pipeline alternative (Mar 11) — WBUR, National Public Radio, Boston, MA

EVERETT, Mass. — In recent years there has been a revolution in the way New England generates its electricity. Since 2000 the amount produced by burning natural gas has tripled. And today, more than half of our electricity comes from gas imported from outside the region.

But as the use of gas has soared, so too have electric bills here, especially in the dead of winter. That’s when the demand for gas for heating and electricity is highest, creating bottlenecks along interstate pipelines.

The transformation of our electric generating system has ignited a contentious debate over whether additional pipeline capacity is needed.

One possible alternative is natural gas — in a different form. And one alternative to pipelines is located in [Everett upriver from] Boston Harbor along the Mystic River, not far from Logan International Airport.

It’s called the Everett Distrigas LNG terminal, and it’s the oldest terminal of its kind in the United States. For over 40 years ships from foreign countries have been supplying New England with liquefied natural gas.

The Everett LNG tanks contain enough natural gas to heat and light all of Massachusetts for a day, and there are two more LNG terminals, under the sea, 12 miles off the coast of Gloucester Harbor. Built just a few years ago, they’ve gone virtually unused until this winter, when one received a shipment.

…[O]perators of the Maritimes and Northeast Pipeline, which currently brings gas from Canada to the region, recently filed for permission to reverse the flow. That would enable the pipeline to carry cheap shale gas from Pennsylvania, through Massachusetts, back to Canada, and perhaps beyond.

“It’s very funny,” [vice president of operations for GDF Suez Anthony Scaraggi] said. “When you add up all of the capacity they want to bring into New England it’s multiples of the capacity that we actually use in New England. I don’t know how you do that. So that’s classic overbuild.” [Colored & bold emphasis added.]

Webmaster's comment: The Everett terminal site is eminently inappropriate for an LNG terminal, as indicated by the LNG industry, itself; but it's already there. The two offshore terminals near Boston are idle. Canaport LNG in New Brunswick, Canada, has been operating at a mere fraction of capacity. If we are destined to burn natural gas while renewable forms of energy are developed, then why invest even more billions of dollars in new pipelines that would be needed for only around 40 days a year when the necessary natural gas supply infrastructure already exists?

Northeast

State legislative Dems want Gov. Cuomo to reject Port Ambrose gas project (Mar 23) — NY Daily News, New York, NY

Fifty-two state legislative Democrats have joined the effort to kill a proposed natural gas project off the Long Island coast.

The Dems sent a letter to Cuomo asking that he kill the Port Ambrose project the same way he rejected upstate hydrofracking late last year. They join a host of bipartisan critics of the project, including Senate GOP Leader Dean Skelos and Democratic City Controller Scott Stringer.

Phila. again ponders allure of liquefied natural gas (Mar 22) — philly.com, Philadelphia, PA

Despite Philadelphia City Council's "unqualified" rejection nine years ago of a terminal for liquefied natural gas, the city is once again flirting with the money-making allure of LNG.

The most ambitious plan floated publicly is a $2.1 billion proposal to expand the Port Richmond plant's capacity to export LNG to European markets.

"It's not a project we should be considering at all," State Sen. Mike Stack, now the lieutenant governor, said in 2006 after visiting Boston to witness its LNG traffic.

City Council rejected the plan in 2006 by a 12-2 vote in a nonbinding resolution declaring its "unqualified opposition to any project that would create an LNG shipping terminal within the City of Philadelphia."

There is no shortage of complications that could trip up a revived plan to build an export terminal, which would attract substantial activist opposition this time because exports would boost demand for hydraulically fractured shale gas.

An export terminal would need upgraded pipelines to deliver up to 700 million cubic feet of gas a day to the LNG plant. The Tioga Marine Terminal would need to be relocated to accommodate LNG vessels. And the major bridges linking this area with New Jersey might be closed during the departure of LNG vessels. [Colored & bold emphasis added.]

Webmaster's comment: Dollar signs again blind public servants.

Southeast

American LNG Marketing granted authority for LNG exports to FTA nations — LNG Law Blog

The U.S. Department of Energy has issued an order granting American LNG Marketing authority to export over a 20-year period 3.02 Bcf/year of LNG produced at the proposed Hialeah liquefaction facility in Medley, Fla. American LNG Marketing is authorized to export the LNG to nations having a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with the United States.

Alaska

House OKs bill to limit Walker’s gas plan (Mar 23) — Fairbanks Daily News, Fairbanks, AK

JUNEAU — In the latest tussle between Gov. Bill Walker and the Republican-led House, the House on Monday night passed a bill directly aimed at halting Walker’s plans to field an alternative to a producer-backed gas line project.

House Bill 132 explicitly prevents the state from fielding its own large-scale pipeline project until either the fulfillment or failure of a state partnership with the North Slope oil producers on a liquefied natural gas export project known as Alaska LNG.

The move is a direct response to Walker’s plans to use Alaska Gasline Development Corporation to explore upsizing the in-state line known as the Alaska Standalone Gas Pipeline, or ASAP. Walker announced the plan amid concerns that Alaska LNG might not be the best deal for Alaskans.

British Columbia & Oregon

Woodfibre LNG Project opposition heats up as FortisBC Inc challenges Squamish permit denial (Mar 23) — Financial Post, Don Mills, ON

B.C. utility provider FortisBC filed a petition March 10 with the province’s Supreme Court against the district of Squamish, after the municipality rejected an application to study the feasibility for a natural gas export pipeline.

“It’s fair to say, from a utility perspective, we have never come up against this type of opposition,” said Trevor Bourdeau, spokesperson for FortisBC, as people have linked some of the developments to the larger debate on climate change.

The permits are necessary for FortisBC to conduct feasibility work on its $520-million Eagle Mountain pipeline for its customer Woodfibre LNG, which is proposing a small liquefied natural gas export project in the area.

Oregon LNG project races B.C. rivals (Mar 8) — The Globe and Mail, Toronto, ON

A liquefied natural gas project in Oregon must find suitable partners as it strives to beat B.C. rivals in the race to be the first large exporter of LNG from the West Coast of North America.

Veresen Inc.’s Jordan Cove LNG venture has a prospective new partner, Energy Fundamentals Group Inc. (EFG), while other investors waiting in the wings include prominent Canadian hedge fund West Face Capital Inc., which has emerged as a surprise participant in the EFG-led consortium that is seeking to buy a minority stake in the project in Coos Bay, Ore.

Canada

LNG exports from Canada a distant prospect, analyst says (Mar 3) — CBC News

Energy economist Kenneth Medlock says Canada's projects are too expensive to compete

The ship has already sailed in the global race to export liquefied natural gas to Asia, according to U.S. energy economist Kenneth Medlock — and Canada has missed it.

Medlock was a keynote speaker at the Canadian Energy Research Institute's annual conference on natural gas. This year the conference was called LNG: Canada's Last Window of Opportunity.

"We don't see any LNG exports from Canada until almost 2040," he said in an interview.

The largest issue is cost. Canadian projects are greenfield, meaning they are being built from scratch.

Once [US LNG export] capacity comes online, Medlock expects, Asian LNG prices will drop to the point where Canadian facilities are no longer viable.

Turkey

Turkey says no to LNG tankers in the Bosporus Strait, cuts off Black Sea shipping — Oil & Gas 360

[This article also appears under the Passamaquoddy Bay heading, above.]

Turkey’s decision could cut off Black Sea countries like Ukraine from LNG tankers

Turkey announced that it will not allow the passage of tankers with liquefied natural gas (LNG) across the Bosporus Strait for fuel supplies to Ukraine, Turkish Ambassador to Kiev Yonet Can Tezel said in an interview Friday. The Bosporus Strait is the only waterway connecting the Black Sea to the Sea of Marmara and on to the Mediterranean, meaning no LNG tankers will be able to enter or leave the Black Sea.

The Ambassador said Turkey’s position was based exclusively on the aspect of maritime shipment safety as the passage of tankers with hazardous cargoes posed a threat to residents of Istanbul, which is divided by the Bosporus Strait, reports Russian news agency TASS. [Colored & bold emphasis added.]

Webmaster's comment: Get it, Downeast LNG? The strait's coastal nation (Turkey) prohibits LNG ship transits through the strait for safety reasons — just as Canada prohibits LNG transits through Head Harbour Passage to and from Downeast LNG's proposed terminal.

Top


@MEMBER OF PROJECT HONEY POT
Spam Harvester Protection Network
provided by Unspam