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3-Nation Alliance

Alliance to Protect the Quoddy Region
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"For much of the state of Maine, the environment is the economy"
                                           — US Senator Susan Collins, 2012 Jun 21



 

Latest News


2015 July 6

Passamaquoddy Bay

Downeast LNG names chairman, progresses project (Jul 3) — LNG World News

Downeast LNG informed that George Petrides has been appointed Chairman of its Board of Directors.

Commenting on his new role Petrides, an investment banker and investor in the energy industry for 30 years, said, “We expect to admit additional investment soon to keep development and permitting on pace as we advance to building out the project for an estimated $2.2 billion.”

Nova Scotia

Black & Veatch, U.S. Market Impact Assessment for LNG Exports at the Bear Head Export Project (Feb) — US Department of Energy

Black & Veatch utilized a scenario analysis to assess the potential price impact of 1.2 Bcf/d of related gas demand related to LNG exports from the Bear Head Project. Based on our independent assessment, these proposed export volumes are expected to have a limited price impact both in New England and across the rest of the U.S. during the analysis period when incremental gas pipeline infrastructure into New England is constructed and completed by 2019.

Black & Veatch’s With Bear Head Project Exports analysis indicates that export volumes from the Bear Head Project would contribute to an estimated $0.04/MMBtu (0.8%) increase in gas prices at the Henry Hub during the first 15 years of operation. The price impact during the remaining 16 years is expected to be an average increase of $0.01/MMBtu (0.1%) over the Base Case average price of $8.55/MMBtu.…

A portion of the Bear Head Project export volumes are expected to originate at Dracut, Massachusetts, the pipeline interconnect between Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline (“M&NP”) and Tennessee Gas Pipeline (“TGP”), and will have a higher price impact on the Algonquin city-gates than on Henry Hub. The Base Case price impact at Algonquin city-gates is projected to be $0.10/MMBtu (1.8%) over the first 15 years of the Bear Head Project’s operations. The price impact for the latter half of the analysis period is slightly less, increasing the Base Case average price of $8.68/MMBtu by $0.09/MMBtu (1.0%). [Colored & bold emphasis added.]

Maine

Maine pipeline fight likely heading to court (Jun 27) — Portland Press Herald, Portland, ME

A multimillion-dollar dispute between the natural gas pipeline company doing the Kennebec Valley pipeline project and its major contractor is likely to go to a trial before a federal judge.

Schmid sued Summit for $72 million in damages in December 2013, saying Summit had breached its contract with the company and underestimated the scope of necessary work on the pipeline network. As a result, Schmid said it had to increase the number of workers and their working hours while providing more in materials and equipment without Summit increasing its payments.

Northeast

NOPE media advisory for LNG export agenda revealed [Press release] (May 28) — Beyond Extreme Energy

Approval of Natural Gas Export Terminal Debunks FERC’s Claim That Massive Pipeline Buildout Not For Export

A grassroots coalition, No Pipeline Expansion (NOPE), stated today that the Department of Energy’s (DOE) approval of the Pieridae liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal in Nova Scotia, Canada confirms their position that natural gas from Spectra Energy’s northeast pipeline expansions will be shipped overseas. According to the Pieridae website, “the Pieridae facility is located adjacent to the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline, a 1,400-kilometre transmission pipeline system built to transport natural gas between developments in Nova Scotia, Atlantic Canada and the northeastern United States.” The Spectra Maritimes & Northeast pipeline connects directly to the Spectra Algonquin pipeline in Beverly, MA. Exports by Spectra, assisted by the proposed Kinder Morgan greenfield pipeline and Peabody lateral, could feed most of Pieridae’s needs for gas.

Marcellus Shale region to see wave of large pipeline projects (Jun 23) — Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Pittsburgh, PA

Over the next three years, the Marcellus Shale region can expect to see about 17 pipeline projects meant to ship about 17.3 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas out of Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio to end-users, according to IHS Energy.

Those destinations “are varied, and in addition to New England, some are targeting the Midwest, eastern Canada and the South,” said Matthew Piatek, associate director of North American natural gas for IHS, which tracks energy markets.

The new infrastructure is in high demand. As natural gas production ramped up in the Marcellus and Utica regions, the existing pipeline network to take that fuel from well sites to market has been maxed out.

“That’s been one of the areas we expect to see major growth in demand, particularly for LNG exports from the Atlantic and Gulf Coast areas, new gas-fired generation in the Southeast, as well as an appetite for [local distribution companies] through the Midwest,” Mr. Piatek said. [Colored & bold emphasis added.]

Gulf of Mexico

FERC concerned with viability of CE FLNG project — LNG Law Blog

FERC Staff has sent a letter to CE FLNG, LLC (CE FLNG), an affiliate of Cambridge Energy Group Limited, regarding the status of its proposed self-propelled floating LNG export terminal on the Mississippi River near Baptiste Collette Bayou in Plaquemines Parish, La. The letter states that due to CE FLNG’s project schedule changes and the lack of a complete set of filed draft resource reports, Staff was “concerned about the viability of the Project and the use of Commission resources in support of the pre-filing process.” The letter directs CE FLNG to submit draft resource reports in support of its project by August 1, 2015, or the pre-filing process will be suspended, in which case CE FLNG would need to begin the pre-filing process anew if it wants to move forward with the project. [Colored & bold emphasis added.]

Webmaster's comment: Hell may freeze over, again! Downeast LNG and Calais LNG were both dismissed from permitting by FERC — the first and second LNG terminal projects ever to be dismissed by FERC from permitting. Could CE FLNG become the third?

FERC initiates Pre-Filing process for Venture Global Plaquemines LNG project (Jul 2) — LNG Law Blog

FERC has granted Venture Global Plaquemines LNG, LLC’s (Plaquemines LNG) request to begin pre-filing review for the proposed 2,800 MMcf/day liquefaction and export terminal to be located near river mile marker 55 on the west side of the Mississippi River, in Plaquemines Parish, La. The project would include 20 liquefaction trains, each with a capacity of approximately 140 MMcf/day, four LNG storage tanks, and three marine loading berths for ocean-going vessels.

Energy Department authorizes Sabine Pass Liquefaction’s expansion project to export liquefied natural gas (Jun 27) — Yuma News Now, Yuma, AZ

Washington, DC - The Energy Department announced today that it has issued a final authorization for Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC’s Expansion Project (Sabine Pass) to export domestically produced liquefied natural gas (LNG) to countries that do not have a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with the United States.

Webmaster's comment: The Department of Energy is required to approve exports to FTA nations.

Caribbean

Trinidad and Tobago LNG bound for Puerto Rico — LNG World News

The cargo is being carried by the 138,000 cbm British Trader, and it is expected to arrive at the Peñuelas LNG terminal around July 7, shipping data reveals.

EcoElectrica operates the facility located at Guayanilla Bay, Peñuelas, about nine miles west of Ponce, Puerto Rico and uses the gas to fire a 461 megawatt power plant.

British Columbia

Justin Trudeau open to LNG ships on northern B.C. coast (Jun 30) — The Vancouver Sun, Vancouver, BC

Federal Liberal leader Justin Trudeau said Monday his mind is closed to oil tankers plying the waters of northern B.C. but open to shipping of liquefied natural gas as well as increased oil tanker traffic through Port Metro Vancouver — on the condition proper reviews are conducted.

[Living Oceans Society executive director Karen Wristen] noted that oil shipping in the Salish Sea puts endangered resident killer whales at risk in their critical habitat, while LNG shipping in the north poses a threat to marine species such as threatened fin whales. “Wherever it is, more traffic means more noise and disruption,” she said.

LNG caught in federal political crossfire — The Vancouver Sun, Vancouver, BC

Trudeau spoke positively about LNG in an interview with The Sun last week, saying he spoke to First Nations leaders on the north coast who are fiercely opposed to oilsands pipelines but have fewer concerns with LNG. [Colored & bold emphasis added.]

Canada awards license for LNG exports to Asia (Jul 1) — UPI

Quicksilver Resources received a 25-year export license from the National Energy Board to send LNG from a facility in British Columbia.

Quicksilver's parent company in March filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Chief Executive Officer Glenn Darden said in a statement at the time its marketing process "has not produced viable options" for capital.

The company's Canadian subsidiary, which applied for the export license, was not included in the bankruptcy proceedings.

Oregon

Wyden: Oregon LNG executive ‘way over the line’ in dismissing local review — The Daily Astorian, Astoria, OR

After the state Land Use Board of Appeals in April upheld Clatsop County’s rejection of a permit for a portion of the pipeline, Peter Hansen, Oregon LNG’s chief executive officer, told an energy industry publication: “If local permits were required from every little jurisdiction along a FERC (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission) interstate pipeline, you would never get any pipeline built anywhere.”

“That’s not the way we do it in Oregon,” Wyden said during an afternoon visit to Fort George Brewery and Public House’s Lovell Showroom. “We talk about making sure you find common ground.”

Wyden has said Oregon LNG, like the Jordan Cove LNG project near Coos Bay, should have a “full airing” of land use and environmental issues.Webmaster's comment: xx

Canada

Report casts doubt on Canada's LNG ambitions — [The Canadian Press] Stockhouse.com

CALGARY - A new report by the Carbon Tracker Initiative is throwing some cold water on Canada's liquefied natural gas ambitions.

It identifies $283 billion in possible projects worldwide that may not be needed, including $82 billion in Canada over the next decade in a low-demand scenario.

"As far as we can see, from our demand scenario the LNG market is pretty fully built out in terms of supply for the next seven years at least," he said in an interview from New York. "It wouldn't be a great bet in our view ... to expand further at this time." [Colored & bold emphasis added.]

United States: Department of Energy approves first export of Canadian LNG made from natural gas produced in the United States (Jun 30) — Mondaq [Registration]

[This article also appears under the United States heading, below.]

In a groundbreaking decision, the US Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy ("DOE/FE") issued its Order 3639 ("Order") on Friday, May 22, 2015 with respect to Pieridae Energy (USA) Ltd. ("Pieridae") — a client of Norton Rose Fulbright US LLP and Norton Rose Fulbright Canada LLP. While similar in many respects to the numerous earlier orders the DOE/FE has issued authorizing entities to export liquefied natural gas ("LNG") to countries having free trade agreements requiring the national treatment of trade in natural gas ("FTA countries"), this was the first time the DOE/FE has issued an order providing for natural gas to be exported to Canada for the express purpose of being converted to LNG and then re-exported to other countries.

In situations involving the conversion of natural gas to LNG in the US and the subsequent export of the LNG the DOE/FE's approach is clear, it follows the LNG in transit until the LNG reaches its final destination. Delivering LNG to the first port-of-call does not end the DOE/FE's involvement. If the LNG is reloaded and sent on to a subsequent destination, the location of ultimate end-use of the LNG must fall within the scope of the US exporter's DOE/FE export authorization or the exporter will be subject to sanctions, including the revocation of its export authorization.

Currently, there are no docketed applications before the DOE/FE that propose to export LNG made in Canada (or Mexico) to non-FTA countries, where such LNG would be made with US-sourced natural gas that was exported into Canada (or Mexico) on the basis of a DOE/FE Order authorizing export of such feedstock natural gas only to FTA countries. However, the DOE/FE, nevertheless, used the Order to put future applicants on notice that the DOE/FE would not grant such an application.… [Colored & bold emphasis added.]

United States

TTIP aim to lift US oil export ban goes against climate targets (Jul 3) — The Guardian

If EU policy makers find it useful to kneel down and pray for cheap American energy to flood in and free us from Putin’s grasp then that is their prerogative, but their time would be better spent reading up on the logistics.

The US does not have the infrastructure or facilities necessary to export LNG at scale to Europe, and the development of said infrastructure would be expensive and time intensive. When finally in place, the transportation and liquefaction process is not cheap. So, there is little reason to think US LNG will be able to out-compete low-cost Russian gas anytime soon, which will likely remain the natural order of things for decades to come.

Even if all restrictions were lifted, cheap American energy would likely remain as it is now: little more than a pipe dream.

If we are to avoid the most severe impacts of climate change, 80% of known fossil fuel reserves must remain in the ground. It is inexcusable that the EU is pushing for measures in a trade deal that would – as envisioned - likely lead to more investment sunk into fossil fuel exploration, extraction, processing and transport, and in doing so potentially lock in high carbon dirty energy for the foreseeable future. [Colored & bold emphasis added.]

United States: Department of Energy approves first export of Canadian LNG made from natural gas produced in the United States (Jun 30) — Mondaq [Registration]

[This article also appears under the Canada heading, above.]

In a groundbreaking decision, the US Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy ("DOE/FE") issued its Order 3639 ("Order") on Friday, May 22, 2015 with respect to Pieridae Energy (USA) Ltd. ("Pieridae") — a client of Norton Rose Fulbright US LLP and Norton Rose Fulbright Canada LLP. While similar in many respects to the numerous earlier orders the DOE/FE has issued authorizing entities to export liquefied natural gas ("LNG") to countries having free trade agreements requiring the national treatment of trade in natural gas ("FTA countries"), this was the first time the DOE/FE has issued an order providing for natural gas to be exported to Canada for the express purpose of being converted to LNG and then re-exported to other countries.

In situations involving the conversion of natural gas to LNG in the US and the subsequent export of the LNG the DOE/FE's approach is clear, it follows the LNG in transit until the LNG reaches its final destination. Delivering LNG to the first port-of-call does not end the DOE/FE's involvement. If the LNG is reloaded and sent on to a subsequent destination, the location of ultimate end-use of the LNG must fall within the scope of the US exporter's DOE/FE export authorization or the exporter will be subject to sanctions, including the revocation of its export authorization.

Currently, there are no docketed applications before the DOE/FE that propose to export LNG made in Canada (or Mexico) to non-FTA countries, where such LNG would be made with US-sourced natural gas that was exported into Canada (or Mexico) on the basis of a DOE/FE Order authorizing export of such feedstock natural gas only to FTA countries. However, the DOE/FE, nevertheless, used the Order to put future applicants on notice that the DOE/FE would not grant such an application.… [Colored & bold emphasis added.]

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